Cracking Down on the COVID Conundrum

Cracking Down on the COVID Conundrum

By Laci Sutton / Staff Writer

Covid vaccines have been in distribution for nearly five months, and are becoming more available.

The state of Kansas currently has a total of 772,000 people fully vaccinated, which is approximately 26.5% of the state.

Kansas is in Phase Five of the vaccination process. This phase includes all people over the age of 18.

Until recently, there were three options of vaccines – Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson.

Pfizer and Moderna vaccinations are given in a two-dose series with a month in-between each dose.

Johnson & Johnson is a single dose, however the use of this vaccine has been paused by the Center for Disease Control due to cases of blood clotting following administration.

Each vaccine has undergone extensive testing to meet the standards and qualifications and have received emergency use authorization from the FDA.

Even with the approval from the FDA, many are still skeptical about the safety of receiving the vaccine.

Justina Patton is a Hutchinson freshman at Hutchinson Community College, and she said she does not plan to get vaccinated.

“I don’t believe we have enough information about it and how it could potentially affect us later on in our lives,” Patton said.

Many HutchCC students and staff have had the opportunity to be vaccinated.

Just as those who choose to not get the vaccine have a number of reasons against it, those who choose to get vaccinated also have many different reasons for getting it.

Nolan Meyer is a HutchCC freshman from Perry, and his motivation for getting vaccinated came from his job.

“There was an incentive program at my job to get the vaccine.” Meyer said. “If we present our vaccine card to (human resources), we get $100.”

Madison Shotton is a HutchCC freshman from Pomona, and like Meyer, has gotten vaccinated.

“Everyone has their own opinions and it was scary hearing what people were saying, but the research speaks for itself.” Shotton said. “I want this pandemic to be over, and I wanted to do my part.”

With vaccines, it’s possible that everyone will have different reactions. The covid vaccine is no exception.

“I got the Pfizer vaccine and just had some minor body aches and nasal congestion, but otherwise it wasn’t too bad,” Meyer said.

“I got the Moderna vaccine and I was miserable,” Shotton said. “I was super nauseous and threw up a lot.”

There are several options for those who want to get vaccinated.

Dillons pharmacy and The Little Clinic located in Dillons Marketplace have vaccines available by appointment. Appointments can be made online at kroger.com/covidvaccine.

Walgreens and the Reno County Health Department have been accepting walk-in vaccinations.

Walmart pharmacy has also had vaccines available.

For questions on eligibility and vaccine availability, contact your local health department. Reno County Health Department can be reached at 620-694-2900.

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