One-way voyage to Mars tempts students

By Branson Strasner

Would you go on a one-way trip to Mars? The non-profit organization Mars One is currently selecting people in an effort to eventually colonize the planet.

Founded in 2010, Mars One hopes to land four people on Mars by the year 2026 and establish a permanent human colony by 2027.

The estimated cost for the project is roughly $6 billion dollars; however the organization has only raised $700,000 so far. The current plan calls for establishing a colony by sending four people in 2027, with four more colonists arriving every 26 months.

Mars One has come under serious criticism from many sources, including former astronauts such as Buzz Aldrin, who accompanied Neil Armstrong on the first manned landing on the moon in 1969.

Several Islamic leaders have forbidden their followers from signing up for the mission, as they believe it’s a form of suicide.

General criticisms include the idea that Mars One is simply stealing money from donors, or that the organization will never reach their funding goal of $6 billion

When asked if they would take the one-way trip to Mars, a number of HCC students and faculty said they would not.

“There are just too many attachments here, family and friends, that I wouldn’t want to leave behind,” said Paula Brin, an instructor.

“Would there be anyone else going? I’d rather not be alone,” asked Sydney Morris, Hutchinson, who also wouldn’t take the trip.

On the contrary, a few people answered that they would jump at the opportunity to be one of the first humans on Mars.

“Yeah, I would take the trip to do something that no one else has ever done before,” said Francisco Escamilla, Sterling.

“Yes, being able to take the first steps to something like this would be amazing,” said Casey Jones, Hutchinson.

While the overall outlook on the Mars One mission does not seem promising, the prospect of pioneering the final frontier is too good of an offer for some to pass up.

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